Could I Be an Introspective ENFP?

Is it possible?

Could I be

An introspective

ENFP?

Exploring My Type in Cognitive Personality Theory

Read All About It

ENFP in CPT

As I continued to explore the field of typology, I discovered Cognitive Personality Theory. CPT is an approach to Jungian psychology developed by Harry Murrell, and it differs from both MBTI and Socionics.

First, I watched a number of the videos on Harry’s YouTube channel to familiarize myself with the basic concepts of CPT. Next I purchased and read his eBook. Some aspects of the theory made a lot of sense to me. For example, Harry postulates that the auxiliary to the dominant function has the same orientation—extraverted or introverted—as the dominant. On the other hand, CPT defines ‘extraversion’ and ‘introversion’ differently than MBTI-related typologies, which created some confusion.

Finally, I tried to determine my CPT type. Because CPT is so different from other Jungian typologies, I was struggling to discover where I fit. So what was the solution? Set up an interview with Harry Murrell himself and see what he says.

Let the Expert Decide

Harry interviewed me on June 28. After that, I left the following recommendation on his website:

Talking with Harry is like talking with a really good friend…except the conversation is all about you! I am not usually very comfortable talking to a complete stranger about my inner workings, but Harry made the experience easy. Two hours sped by, and I eagerly awaited the results, which came—exactly as promised—ten days later. The analysis I received was thorough and enlightening, and started me on a process of self-examination…which is ongoing. Getting typed by Harry is well worth the cost! If you are wondering about your type, I highly recommend Harry’s type service.

Harry concluded—initially and finally—that I am an ENT-Fs, also known as the ENFP.

Your Intuition seems both convergent and extraverted in nature, as you seek to encapsulate a broad range of Te responsibilities and simultaneously innovate upon them. Your forward-moving perspective is in keeping with an Intuitive-dominant and the auxiliary to your dominant seems highly objective and rationalistic (Te).

As we explored in our call, it is not unusual for us to identity with the opposite orientation of our cognitive stack as we grow and develop (INFJ in this instance), but any interactions with that particular cognition seem to stem from an Ne centre.

I would say you have a fair amount of axial fluidity between dominant and oppositional functions, and as such there was some difficulty determining whether you were an introspective ENT-Fs or energetic ISF-Tn – on the whole, however, your primary dialogue does seem to be one of abstract interaction with external reality.

Comparing ENFP to Previous Typings

Although somewhat surprised by this analysis, I remembered that I tested as ENFP when I initially took the MBTI decades ago. In addition, I do identify now with the INFJ, as Harry noted. The MBTI Level II that I took last year typed me as an “Emergent INFJ.”

Also, it is interesting that these components of my CPT type are the same as my valued IMEs in Socionics:

  • Dominant: Ne
  • Convergent Auxiliary: Te
  • Divergent Auxiliary: Fi
  • Oppositional: Si

However, they are arranged differently for the EII (my Socionics type):

  • Leading: Fi (R) = 4D, Public, Valued, Strong, Bold, Consistent, Demanding, Stubborn
  • Creative: Ne (I) = 3D, Public, Valued, Strong, Cautious, Variable, Supplying, Flexible
  • Mobilizing: Si (S) = 2D, Private, Valued, Weak, Bold, Variable, Supplying, Stubborn
  • Suggestive: Te (P) = 1D, Private, Valued, Weak, Cautious, Consistent, Demanding, Flexible

For the ENT-Fs in CPT, the Fi divergent auxiliary “performs a much more authoritative role within the stack—the Ne-Te act often at the behest of the Fi….” The characteristics of the leading function in Socionics suggest that it, too, could be described as “authoritative” for me in that system.

Does ENT-Fs (ENFP) Fit Me?

In conclusion, I have carefully considered the description of the ENT-Fs (ENFP) that Harry provided with my results. Grouping the characteristics (and potentials) of the type into four categories yields these findings:

A Lot Like Me

  • Big-picture orientation
  • Future-oriented
  • Natural curiosity
  • Actively creates external organizational structures
  • Often assumes an administrative role within a group
  • Organizes external objects into predictable locations
  • One of the least likely types to read a work of non-fiction and quickly assimilate the information within its pages
  • Possesses an in-depth knowledge across a variety of subjects…and a rich vocabulary
  • Finds conversation an active listening experience to the self
  • Comfortable achieving mastery over otherwise superficial skill sets
  • Highly attuned to my own needs, values, and sense of identity
  • Needs and values [are] in anticipation of a future self
  • Follows emotions that have a more abstract significance
  • Takes a big-picture view of one’s overall emotions to reach an equation for one’s own happiness
  • Idealistic, particularly regarding love and a deeper, more long-term sense of happiness
  • Highly empathetic
  • Not always consciously aware of the emotional order of one’s external world
  • Convergent Te activated when organizing and planning of behalf of a[n]…Fi-related attachment
  • Organizes the external world to promote an internal sense of harmony and mitigate [offensive] human conflict

Somewhat Like Me

  • Preoccupied with new experiences and the observation of patterns in real time
  • Struggles with day-to-day details (details are not my strong point)
  • Remarkably adaptable
  • May often taken an active role in experimenting with different perspectives through spiritual…means
  • Quickly understands a general mechanical infrastructure
  • Extremely theoretical
  • Prone to manipulation by people selling linear and too-good-to-be-true life elixirs
  • Often finds greatest individual happiness placing the needs of others above the self
  • High degree of nostalgia

Iffy

  • Intense desire for new experiences as opposed to what it already known
  • Restlessness of character
  • Highly interested in different cultures and subcultures
  • Natural affinity for time-sensitive action plans
  • Well-suited for management positions
  • More given than other types to forget where I placed an object

Not Like Me at All

  • Struggles with prolonged concentration
  • Turns natural curiosity less toward insight and revelation…, but rather toward the unexplored in the external world (just the opposite)
  • May often taken an active role in experimenting with different perspectives through…psychedelic means
  • ‘Hyperactivity’ (quest to perceive as many things at one time as possible)
  • Constantly seeking new experiences and life philosophies (instead, developing and deepening certain consistent life themes, such as my spiritual life, understanding of self, education, etc.)
  • Various fetishes

Structure in Typology

Exploring Thomson’s Typology Structure

Structure in typology began to interest me back in January when I was reading the book Personality Type: An Owner’s Manual by Lenore Thomson. Of particular interest to me was the chapter “Personality Types Are Also Brain Types.” In it Ms. Thomson stated that PET scans placed each cognitive function in a specific area of the brain:

  • Front of Left Brain: Extraverted Thinking, Extraverted Feeling
  • Back of Left Brain: Introverted Sensation, Introverted Intuition
  • Front of Right Brain: Extraverted Intuition, Extraverted Sensation
  • Back of Right Brain: Introverted Feeling, Introverted Thinking

Also surprising to me was that Ms. Thomson identified the Tertiary and Inferior functions as the weakest of all eight cognitive functions. After the Dominant and Secondary functions, she places two “alternatives” that reside on the same side of the brain. Following those are two “double agents” located on the other side of the brain, where the Tertiary and Inferior functions are located. For me, as an INFJ in the MBTI system, Thomson identified the following as my “type lasagna”:

  • Dominant: Introverted Intuition (Left Brain)
  • Secondary: Extraverted Feeling (Left Brain)
  • Left-Brain Alternatives: Introverted Sensation, Extraverted Thinking
  • Right-Brain Double Agents: Introverted Feeling, Extraverted Intuition
  • Tertiary: Introverted Thinking (Right Brain)
  • Inferior: Extraverted Sensation (Right Brain)

Contrasting C. S. Joseph’s Typology Structure

In contrast to Thomson’s model was one with which I was somewhat more familiar at that time. This was C. S. Joseph’s “four sides of the mind.” Although I am not an expert his his typology, I have viewed a number of his YouTube videos. He assigns a different personality type to each side of the mind. For an INFJ like me, these sides of the mind are:

  • Ego: INFJ = Ni Fe Ti Se (see Dominant + Secondary above)
  • Unconscious: ENFP = Ne Fi Te Si (see Right-Brain Double Agents above)
  • Subconscious: ESTP = Se Ti Fe Ni (see Inferior + Tertiary above)
  • Superego: ISTJ = Si Te Fi Ne (see Left-Brain Alternatives above)

Remembering Something about MBTI Typology Structure

While pondering these discrepancies, I was struck by a sudden memory of something I had noticed when skimming through a portion of the MBTI Manual (3rd ed.). In that system, the Secondary, Tertiary, and Inferior functions all have the opposite orientation to the Dominant. Therefore, an INFJ would have:

  • Dominant: Introverted Intuition
  • Auxiliary (Secondary): Extraverted Feeling
  • Tertiary: Extraverted Thinking
  • Inferior: Extraverted Sensation

Because this differed from other MBTI-related systems I had encountered, I started to wonder: how are different typologies structured? I should note that my focus was solely on typology structure. As a result, I did not consider the various ways in which cognitive functions or information metabolism elements are defined.

Developing My Structural Analysis

Recently I became quite interested in Socionics. Consequently, I decided to start my analysis with Model A. In that system, my type is EII (Ethical Intuitive Integrator). In addition to the systems I have already mentioned, I also looked at Beebe‘s and Socionics Model J. After working on my diagram for a couple of weeks, I ended up with this:

Structure in Typology for teh EII

Haunted by Carl Jung

Ancient History

Many years ago (in the early 1970s) Dr. Morrel Clute, one of my professors in the College of Education at Wayne State University, introduced us to the Jungian model of perception-judgment styles and speculated on how each might respond to various teaching styles. I was so intrigued with the idea of matching teaching methods to students’ perception-judgment styles that I designed the experiment for my doctoral dissertation on this foundation. At that time, I took the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and learned that I was an ENFP.

Revival

I am not exactly sure what prompted the intense revival of my interest in Jung’s personality styles earlier this year. I began to search for online tests and found a number of websites which offered them. I was surprised to learn that nearly all of the ones I took typed me as an INFJ (although the preference strengths varied from test to test).

Seeking further information about myself, I also looked for online cognitive function tests on the web. One that I found was at SimilarMinds.com. The results of the test are presented below. Apparently they were so strange that my “type” could not be determined from them. I was not sure what to make of this!

Jungian Functions Test Results

Te (Extroverted Thinking) |||||| 30%
Ti (Introverted Thinking) |||||||||| 35%
Ne (Extroverted Intuition) |||||||||||| 50%
Ni (Introverted Intuition) |||||||||||||||||||| 85%
Se (Extroverted Sensing) || 5%
Si (Introverted Sensing) |||||||||||| 50%
Fe (Extroverted Feeling) |||||||||||||| 55%
Fi (Introverted Feeling) |||||||||||||||||||| 85%

Take Free Jungian Functions Test
Personality Tests by SimilarMinds.com

I found a number of other tests on the site. One was called a “Jung Word Test,” and its results were consistent with those I got on other sites.

INFJ – “Author”. Strong drive and enjoyment to help others. Complex personality. 1.5% of total population.

Free Jung Word Test (similar to Myers-Briggs)
Personality Tests by SimilarMinds.com

Another test promised results for both my Jungian type and my Enneagram (previous results on that revealed 1w2). The results are shown below.

INFJ – “Author”. Strong drive and enjoyment to help others. Complex personality. 1.5% of total population.

Enneagram Test Results

Type 1 Orderliness |||||||||||||||||||| 86%
Type 2 Helpfulness |||||||||||||| 60%
Type 3 Image Focus |||||| 26%
Type 4 Individualism |||||||||||||||| 66%
Type 5 Intellectualism |||||| 23%
Type 6 Security Focus |||||| 26%
Type 7 Adventurousness |||||||||| 33%
Type 8 Aggressiveness |||||||||||||||||| 73%
Type 9 Calmness |||||| 26%

Your main type is 1
Your variant is social

Free Jung + Enneagram Personality Test
Personality Tests by SimilarMinds.com

Retest

I finally decided to invest in a retake of the (updated since the 70s) Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, which indicated that I am an INFJ; and then the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, Level II, which labeled me an “Emergent INFJ.” The Level II was interesting because it broke down the dichotomies into components, revealing both typical-of-type and atypical traits.

I began to find MBTI aficionados on Twitter and Facebook, and followed many of them. One of them even designed a 29-question personality test that I found interesting…and accurate. Take the quiz here.

My search for self-understanding continues.